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It’s more than just a phone!

Mobile phones do have their uses, especially if you are a forward thinking sports fanatic. A sports fan called Moze Galo watched Joseph Parkers fight and decided to “live” stream it onto his Facebook page to an audience that is reported to have been over 20,000 viewers! Joseph Parker and Carlos Takam battled it out in a gruelling fight which went the distance. Parker is now undefeated in nineteen fights and is looking to take on Antony Joshua in a world title bout. However, the fight against Takam will most likely be remembered more for the antics of Moze Galo. His “live” video has now been watched by over 100,000 people and is the subject of scrutiny by a legal team. Fans wanting to watch the fight were charged $50 by Sky, who broadcast the event. However, it was free for viewers of Galo’s page. Promoter Dean Lonergan has said he will investigate suing the “live” streamers for allowing such a video to be aired. The legal costs alone make well reach more than $100,000 and lawyer Rick Shera has said they would have to prove that a significant portion of the live stream viewers represented lost sales. It’s of no surprise that the root problem of this whole situation is not what was done by Galo, but more to the fact it was allowed to be shown and getting out there in the first place. Shera made it quite clear that both his client and Sky have taken this matter extremely seriously and will have no qualms in taking anyone who has infringed on their broadcasting right to court and ultimately seeks repayment or bankruptcy from the accused. Facebook, who have been involved in this case, have publicly declared they have done all they can. There are significant reporting tools made available for anyone to report potential infringements and that their global team are responsive to such reports. The case continues and no doubt in the very near future an announcement will be made to update what will be happening to not only Galo and his live streaming but also to anyone else who feels they also can take advantage of a situation.

Mobile phones do have their uses, especially if you are a forward thinking sports fanatic. A sports fan called Moze Galo watched Joseph Parkers fight and decided to “live” stream it onto his Facebook page to an audience that is reported to have been over 20,000 viewers! Joseph Parker and Carlos Takam battled it out in a gruelling fight which went the distance. Parker is now undefeated in nineteen fights and is looking to take on Antony Joshua in a world title bout. However, the fight against Takam will most likely be remembered more for the antics of Moze Galo. His “live” video has now been watched by over 100,000 people and is the subject of scrutiny by a legal team. Fans wanting to watch the fight were charged $50 by Sky, who broadcast the event. However, it was free for viewers of Galo’s page.  Promoter Dean Lonergan has said he will investigate suing the “live” streamers for allowing such a video to be aired. The legal costs alone make well reach more than $100,000 and lawyer Rick Shera has said they would have to prove that a significant portion of the live stream viewers represented lost sales.  It’s of no surprise that the root problem of this whole situation is not what was done by Galo, but more to the fact it was allowed to be shown and getting out there in the first place. Shera made it quite clear that both his client and Sky have taken this matter extremely seriously and will have no qualms in taking anyone who has infringed on their broadcasting right to court and ultimately seeks repayment or bankruptcy from the accused. Facebook, who have been involved in this case, have publicly declared they have done all they can. There are significant reporting tools made available for anyone to report potential infringements and that their global team are responsive to such reports. The case continues and no doubt in the very near future an announcement will be made to update what will be happening to not only Galo and his live streaming but also to anyone else who feels they also can take advantage of a situation.Mobile phones do have their uses, especially if you are a forward thinking sports fanatic. A sports fan called Moze Galo watched Joseph Parker’s fight and decided to “live” stream it onto his Facebook page to an audience that is reported to have been over 20,000 viewers!

Joseph Parker and Carlos Takam battled it out in a gruelling fight which went the distance. Parker is now undefeated in nineteen fights and is looking to take on Antony Joshua in a world title bout. However, the fight against Takam will most likely be remembered more for the antics of Moze Galo. His “live” video has now been watched by over 100,000 people and is the subject of scrutiny by a legal team. Fans wanting to watch the fight were charged $50 by Sky, who broadcast the event. However, it was free for viewers of Galo’s page.

Promoter Dean Lonergan has said he will investigate suing the “live” streamers for allowing such a video to be aired. The legal costs alone make well reach more than $100,000 and lawyer Rick Shera has said they would have to prove that a significant portion of the live stream viewers represented lost sales.

It’s of no surprise that the root problem of this whole situation is not what was done by Galo, but more to the fact it was allowed to be shown and getting out there in the first place. Shera made it quite clear that both his client and Sky have taken this matter extremely seriously and will have no qualms in taking anyone who has infringed on their broadcasting right to court and ultimately seeks repayment or bankruptcy from the accused.

Facebook, who have been involved in this case, have publicly declared they have done all they can. There are significant reporting tools made available for anyone to report potential infringements and that their global team are responsive to such reports.

The case continues and no doubt in the very near future an announcement will be made to update what will be happening to not only Galo and his live streaming but also to anyone else who feels they also can take advantage of a situation.

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